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Soros Fund Management cut Herbalife bet in 3rd qtr after company missed earnings

MLM News November 19, 2014

Soros Fund Management cut Herbalife bet in 3rd qtr after company missed earnings
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one of the world’s most widely followed investment firms, slashed its stake in Herbalife Ltd. by 60 per cent during the third quarter, a period when Herbalife missed

and his family, sold 2.8 million shares of the nutrition and weight loss company, bringing its stake to 1.8 million shares at the end of September, a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday showed.

began betting on its demise in December 2012 with a $1 billion short position. Ackman claims that Herbalife is a pyramid scheme in which distributors earn more money by bringing in new recruits than by the actual sale of products to consumers. The company has steadfastly denied those claims.

Icahn, Herbalife’s biggest investor and who has a handful of directors on the company’s board, held his stake steady at 17 million shares, his SEC filing showed.

This year, Herbalife has lost speed. Its stock price tumbled 32 per cent during the second quarter when the company missed analysts’ consensus earnings estimates for the first time since 2008 and cut its full-year revenue forecast. It missed earnings forecasts again in the third quarter, and its stock price has lost 51 per cent this year.

Herbalife still has supporters, including Richard Perry’s Perry Capital, Herbalife’s sixth largest investor, which raised its stake by 39 per cent, to 5.6 million shares.

Source from http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2014-11-15//56115221_1_earnings-estimates-carl-icahn-tiger-consumer-management

 

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FICCI seeks regulatory clarity for direct selling industry

Uncategorized November 18, 2014

FICCI seeks regulatory clarity for direct selling industry
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Globally, Direct selling involves 90 million individuals and is a $180 billion industry. In India, it is Rs 7000 crore market. It is a people intensive industry offering a self-employment opportunity to individuals, said Rajat Banerji, Co-Chair, FICCI National Task Force on Direct Selling said while delivering the inaugural lecture at a Round Table on Direct Selling Industry in Ahmedabad recently. He said adding that internal trade being a state subject, the Gujarat government could consider providing regulatory clarity on the Direct Selling industry.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/FICCI-seeks-regulatory-clarity-for-direct-selling-industry/articleshow/45167369.cms

 

‘Direct selling industry can touch Rs 64,500 crore by 2025’

MLM News November 18, 2014

‘Direct selling industry can touch Rs 64,500 crore by 2025’
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In India, market is around 0.08% of the GDP at the moment, and hence has huge potential to grow.

Once clear regulatory guidelines are in place, the

industry has the potential to touch Rs 64,500 crore in

by 2025, from a Rs 7,200 crore size now, felt industry experts here.

Talking at sidelines of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), Rajandeep Singh, manager, strategy, strategy & operations, management consulting,

said that countries with a thriving direct selling market, have direct selling market to

 

 

Can The FTC Manage MLM Fraud?

Uncategorized November 18, 2014

Can The FTC Manage MLM Fraud?
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wonder if all MLM companies must inevitably be pyramid schemes. I
wonder why regulators have failed to control behaviors found in
pyramid schemes and seemingly endemic to the MLM model, two
structures so functionally similar as to prompt early FTC action
(see

Below I argue that: 1) industry critics, business journalists,
the Direct Selling Association, and even MLM companies recognize an
ongoing potential for fraud, 2) regulatory action and inaction,
primarily by the FTC, demonstrates an unresolved tension between
managing (i.e., decreasing) fraud and preserving the purported MLM
“business opportunity,” and 3) an apparent inability to resolve
this tension led to a national failure to provide a reasonable
level of consumer protection against MLM fraud.

Below I argue that: 1) industry critics, business journalists,
the Direct Selling Association, and even MLM companies recognize an
ongoing potential for fraud, 2) regulatory action and inaction,
primarily by the FTC, demonstrates an unresolved tension between
managing (i.e., decreasing) fraud and preserving the purported MLM
“business opportunity,” and 3) an apparent inability to resolve
this tension led to a national failure to provide a reasonable
level of consumer protection against MLM fraud.

 

 

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